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MGB V8 Conversions

Last post 06-08-2012, 8:01 AM by lcjutila. 40 replies.
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  •  06-13-2007, 6:04 PM 7663 in reply to 7645

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Underdog:  The 3.5 took a plunge in value when the 4.0 and 4.6 motors started appearing in junkyards. They are still good motors, which is why I'm sticking with them.  A complete buildable motor, bell housing, flywheel, to pivot and LT77 has got to be worth a grand. Add to that your engine work.

    The last couple of motors I got came out of SD1s that I paid $100 each for. I figure there is at least $900 worth of slave labor parting out the cars and taking the remnants to the crusher. I did salvage as many parts as possible to keep my SD1 on the road but it's still a lot of work to get rid of a car.


    Kelvin Dodd
    Global Sourcing Engineer
    Moss Motors, Ltd.
    Helpful Links:
    Code of Conduct
    FAQs

    Disclaimer: Working on automobiles is inherently dangerous. Moss Motors, Ltd. is not liable for injury or damage due to incorrect installation or use of their products. All products are sold with the understanding that the safe and proper installation and use of the products is the customer’s responsibility. Follow factory workshop manual procedures and instructions, but use current shop safety standards and common sense. Some tasks will require professional advice or services which Moss Motors cannot provide.
  •  06-18-2007, 10:19 AM 7768 in reply to 7452

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Bugeyev8:

    I know that you're one to stay true to the MGs British roots...but use a Ford V8 and not the Rover...I spent years with the Rover V8s and they are so big (wide) and require so much work and expensive parts to get them in an MGB , more work than a Ford V8 with 1/2 the power , Ford V8 fits right in later MGBs and parts are so much cheaper for the Ford and the weight is not that much more if you used aluminum heads and intake, use the late roller HO about 230hp stock and the EFI runs great !! and is Ca emissions legal !

    Whoa! The Ford and Rover V8s are both great engines for MGB engine swaps, and the Ford engine is a good way to go if you want over about 200hp inexpensively, but there's simply NO WAY installing the Ford engine can be described as easier than installing the Rover engine!

    The Ford engine is NOT appreciably narrower. On the other hand, its oil sump is mounted forward, and thus presents a major interference issue with the stock MGB front crossmember. Your options are to either (1) cut clearance into and then reinforce the MGB front suspension crossmember, which requires welding skills, (2) install the Ford engine further back into the car, which requires more extensive modification of the firewall/footboxes, (3) install a different front crossmember, such as the one that comes with a FastCars front suspension, or (4) re-engineer the Ford oil pick-up and oilpan. 

    Special headers for getting the Ford engine into an MGB engine bay are more expensive than headers for the Rover motor (if you're not planning on making your own headers).

    The Rover engine can be cooled with a stock MGB radiator core... and can easily be cooled with the extended-core "MGB V8" radiator, provided the engine is tuned properly, air is properly purged from the system, and sufficient airflow is achieved. Figure on a more expensive (aftermarket) radiator to cool the larger, more powerful Ford engine.

    There are a lot of ways to skin a cat... but typically a Ford V8 engined MGB will come out about eighty or a hundred pounds heavier than the Rover engined MGB. Even with aluminum heads (to save about 40 pounds), a Ford V8 powered MGB won't be lighter than a stock MGB. The Rover V8 will be lighter than stock in most cases.

    The Ford EFI system is a great idea... but be aware that it won't fit under a stock MGB hood! (The Ford EFI system will fit under an MGC hood, but they're not cheap.) On the other hand, lots of people have successfully fitted the Rover 14CUX system under the stock MGB bonnet.

    Here are a couple articles that may help if you're interested in these options:

    Installing a Ford EFI V8 in an MGB
    Installing a Rover EFI V8 in an MGB, part 1
    Installing a Rover EFI V8 in an MGB, part 2

    Bottom line: install the engine you want... but choose it for the right reasons. The Rover v8 installation has been done thousands of times (including being done by the factory - in two different eras). The Ford installation has been done enough times to be well-proven, but not enough times that it's become a bolt-in (in terms of kit or parts support) in the same sense. Up to about 200hp, the Rover installation is cost effective, and these cars are a LOT of fun. They start getting real expensive with stroker cranks and big-valve heads. That's why the Ford engine makes more sense for people who think 3.9L just isn't enough. In either case, "The British V8 Newsletter" (at www.britishv8.org) is a great place for further information.

    Note: The British V8 Newsletter is sponsored in part by Moss Motors.

  •  06-19-2007, 12:40 PM 7786 in reply to 7768

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    I know that 90% of the people on here are still in love with the Rover V8 but there are so many problems with it that cost so much to resolve when trying to make power its far more expensive to make a Rover have HP than a Ford, a stock Ford 5.0 will have far more than you can even get from a Rover V8 unless you spend 10k on it 

    All I was trying to do is help people decide between the two with more information,  the Rover is wider if you measure it...I will do so tonight I have both engines in my cars 

    as far as the oil pan issue its an easy fix with a call to Summit Racing to get a rear drop pan and pick up, about 200$ as to the SD1 or TR8 pan you need at 400$ if your using a Range Rover or early Rover or Buick

     The headers that I have seen and used that are"cheaper" are complete junk and they may fit ok and get the exhaust to the rear....they are made as poorly as any I have ever seen and flow no better than stock manifolds , I had to make the last set on the car I did because the ones ordered with the MGB V8 kit were such junk, so you would need to make headers anyway, header kits are cheap for the SBF and easy to assemble with a real collector and long tubes as a proper header will have 

    The cooling will not be an issue if you use the Mustang V8 radiator from the 60s Mustangs fits right in easy and costs about 200$,  far less than the MGB V8 radiator costs abour 400$ 

    as far as weight, when your talkng about power to weight ratio, who cares about 80# when you have over 100hp than the alternative Rover V8

     The injection clearance issues with the Ford are exactly as they are with the Rover hotwire systems and both will require the intake manifolds and plenums to be milled at the mating surfaces to lower the intake , so this is the same...no more work , no less work, you can always go the ancient route and install a 4bbl  carb and intake and make both conversions simple 

    The Rover  engine and transmission cores will cost more than a complete 90s Mustang would cost on the street, I have got the 90s mustangs for 200$ with low miles, pulled the engines and sold the body for what I paid for the whole car, even if you just go to the wreckers and buy a low mile Ford you will be spending no more than 1k for a good engine

     Transmissions Ford T5 is 350$ and the LT77 is 700-900$

     The T5 transmission fits right in a late MGB with no modifications to the tunnel, the LT77 requires quite a bit of work to get the height clearance 

     My question is to all the Rover V8 guys is how many of you were dissapointed with power when the whole thing was done ? If you want to go fast why not spend the time to go really fast ?? if it costs the same in the end ?

     

    I have driven several 215 V8 powered MGBs over the years and they are quick, but the Ford MGBs I have driven were fast and not just quick

     My twin cam Nissan engine in my 74 MGB will give any Rover V8 MGB a good run and should be able to beat it, not really raced anyone yet or done any time tests but after driving fast cars for a while you can just tell and my whole conversion cost less than 2k including the engine and transmission, my friend with a 2003 BMW Z4 will not even think of racing me, he has driven both cars, take a look at the Nissan SR20  MGB GT on Britishv8.org its not mine but this car will amaze you with the acceleration and HP, should have about 300hp

     I guess it all depends on the skills you have and how much you can do yourself, I like to have something different than everyone else, I hate going to car shows and seeing all the cars have the same wheels and the same paint same engines, ect

     I built about 20 Mini Coopers for customers that were all red with the same 1380 engines and same Minilite wheels, It gets old after getting 20 calls..."remember me I have the red Cooper S with the Minilite wheels" like I am supposed to remember that 

    If you have limited skills why not just keep the MGB engine, the early ones have 100hp stock and can be made to have 170 and be reliable, build a large cubic inch MGB engine with low compression  special grind cam for superchargers (elgin cams redwood city Ca) and install a  Moss supercharger, go one better and intercool the supercharger and raise the boost, I have bult MGB engines with near 200Hp before but that was getting expensive but they ran great and were reliable, terrible fuel economy so that should be figured into any engine you are looking at if that kind of thing maters to you 

    the cars I look at at any car shows are the ones that stand out because they are unique, don't do something just because its easy , there is a great reward in having something that you worked hard on work well and get compliments and kick ass on someones "snot rod", buying parts from a catalog is NOT building something yourself, its ordering parts and putting them together, any idiot can do that, changing the valve covers and air filters don't count as being unique

    Just my 2 cents...If you have any questions about conversions or need help with something feel free to email me, I have installed over 20 different engine in different cars and all have worked well and looked factory when done

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  •  06-19-2007, 2:21 PM 7788 in reply to 7786

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    I think these two posts just about define the differences between the Rover and the Ford V8 conversions. The Rover is a well known and researched conversion lump, but the Ford is now the up and comer with a number of solutions coming on to the market to cure the installation headaches.

    Then there is the GM 60 degree V6, which is a pretty easy install on the later cars.

    It's just a question of how much work you want to put into an install, which as BugeyeV8 points out, comes down to how proud you can be with the end result.

    Then there is the option of installing a supercharger and keeping the stock driveline. This is a really good alternative your idea of a sports car includes wire wheels and perhaps an OD transmission.

    In my case a supercharger on a stock 1970 MGB put the brakes on my 1978 MGB V8 project. But it's still going to be built, as no matter which direction you choose, each of any of these conversions and upgrades shows the pride of ownership and engineering of the owner.


    Kelvin Dodd
    Global Sourcing Engineer
    Moss Motors, Ltd.
    Helpful Links:
    Code of Conduct
    FAQs

    Disclaimer: Working on automobiles is inherently dangerous. Moss Motors, Ltd. is not liable for injury or damage due to incorrect installation or use of their products. All products are sold with the understanding that the safe and proper installation and use of the products is the customer’s responsibility. Follow factory workshop manual procedures and instructions, but use current shop safety standards and common sense. Some tasks will require professional advice or services which Moss Motors cannot provide.
  •  06-19-2007, 8:57 PM 7808 in reply to 7788

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Guys,

    V8ed cars a pretty cool, but I'm looking at the future and the horizon, and I see that there will be less of that and more of hi-po inline DOHC fours, turbo'd supercharged, injected, and so on. I quit my MGA V8 conversion shortly after I started it for just that reason. I'm now looking for the perfect four to complement it in both performance and spirit. ... Comments?


    Motorbill
    From Lola to Land Rover, If it's British and has wheels, it's likely I've bloodied me knuckles thereupon
  •  06-19-2007, 9:23 PM 7809 in reply to 7786

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    BugeyeV8, you remain correct that the Ford engine is a great option if you want to make more than about 200hp inexpensively.

    Some of the other points in your new post are either misleading or wrong.

    I can save you the trouble of measuring the width of Ford vs. Rover engine. Those measurements already appear in this article: Big Motors in Need of Little Cars

    Yes, the Ford motor is a whopping two inches narrower, but in reality that just means that both engines are easily narrow enough to fit. The slightly narrower width of the Ford engine doesn't actually help significantly.

    Here's a car with the Olds version of the aluminum engine.


    Here's the same car with the Ford V8.


    No special oil pan needs to be sourced to install a Buick, Oldsmobile or Rover  ("BOPR") aluminum V8 in an MGB. In the case of my car, for example, there's over 3 inches clearance between the stock Buick 215 oil pan and the completely unmodified chrome-bumper MGB crossmember.

    I already agreed with you that the weight difference between Ford and BOPR engines isn't great... but it isn't trivial either. There's more to the weight issue than power-to-weight ratio.

    Lowering the profile of a Ford EFI system to stay under a stock MGB hood should be possible... but getting a Rover EFI system under the hood is routine.

    Consider this picture:


    Can you point me to instructions that show how to lower this Ford EFI induction tract without a clearance issue between the plenum and the driver's-side valve cover? It's already pretty darn close!

    Installing a BOPR engine DOESN'T necessarily mean installing a Rover LT77 transmission!  I just did a quick survey of engine installations that appear in the photo gallery at www.britishv8.org - Based on that, the T5 transmission is actually a more common choice than the LT77 among people who are installing the BOPR aluminum V8s. I have a T5 in my Buick-powered MGB. The Borg-Warner T50, T35, T65, ZF 5-speed, and the Toyota 5-speed (from 280SX etc.) have also been used successfully.

    If one does choose to install the LT77 transmission, here is a picture that shows how easy the mods are:

    Quote: "I guess it all depends on the skills you have and how much you can do yourself, I like to have something different than everyone else, I hate going to car shows and seeing all the cars have the same wheels and the same paint, same engines, etc." 

    FWIW, I like to see a wide variety of cars too... but I've never seen another Buick-powered MGB that looked anything like mine!

    There remain plenty of valid reasons to prefer either engine. Certainly the Ford engine is cheaper to buy, and cheaper to soup up... but the Rover engine is easier to install and the width difference is trivial compared to the Ford's oil pan issues. There is plenty of room for creativity with either engine installation!

    ---

    ALL owners and builders of seriously performance-modified British sports cars are encouraged to submit photos of their cars and "How It Was Done" write-ups for inclusion in the "virtual car show" at www.britishv8.org

  •  06-19-2007, 10:06 PM 7810 in reply to 7808

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Hi Bill!

    I really like overhead cams and electronic fuel injection too. I hope those features become more common! I've posted a couple DOHC fours on the British V8 site. Judging from my e-mail in-box and my website statistics, they're popular with visitors. I'm not sure that I see a trend yet. There are also a number of terrific DOHC EFI V6's out there too!

    -Curtis

    p.s. Just for grins, here are a couple links to 4-cylinder engine swaps:

    Mazda DOHC Four-Cylinder MGA
    Nissan (SR20DET) DOHC Four-Cylinder MGB-GT
    Nissan (CA18DET) DOHC Four-Cylinder MGB-GT
    Honda (VTEC) DOHC Four-Cylinder Sprite
    Toyota (4AGE) DOHC Four-Cylinder Spitfire
    And finally, a really nifty V6 engine in an MGB!


    p.p.s. I'm VERY INTERESTED to publish articles on reasonably-quick electric-converted or hybrid-converted British sports cars. PLEASE let me know if you come across any!
  •  06-20-2007, 6:09 AM 7816 in reply to 7810

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Curtis,

    I'm VERY INTERESTED to do an electric or hybrid conversion on a lightweight Britcar. I wish I could afford the time and bucks to just do one to demonstrate to potential clients. Find me somebody willing to bankroll this.! We have the skills and facilities to do it really right.


    Motorbill
    From Lola to Land Rover, If it's British and has wheels, it's likely I've bloodied me knuckles thereupon
  •  06-20-2007, 6:14 AM 7817 in reply to 7816

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Also,

    On the engine swap front, I say I see a brighter future for hi-po fours for two reasons. One is the price of fuel. The other is that I look to the hot rod industry and hobby to see what's comming in the way of power options. Believe it or not, I'm starting to see lightweight T Bucket and Deuce cars showing up with really dressed out DOHC fours. They are sooooo cool!  Once these guys start to accept something, it's on its way, for sure...


    Motorbill
    From Lola to Land Rover, If it's British and has wheels, it's likely I've bloodied me knuckles thereupon
  •  06-20-2007, 10:48 PM 7835 in reply to 7809

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    BritishV8,

     #1 In the world of building hot rods and fast little cars the 2 inches can be a Huge amount, header clearance ect , and can be the difference of it fitting or not,  my point was... it is wider and that fact is 100% true

    building one car with a different engine makes no one an expert so look close at everything said on this site and double check the facts before doing anything said on this or any site, I see things that are wrong (really wrong) all the time on here and the other MG forum

    #2 if thats the same car then the owner was either unhappy with too much power and changed to a weaker 215 or he decided to do the opposite and install a Ford, if so why did he do that ?

    #3 the later Rover engines have a huge aluminum oil pan and if you don't already have a 215 oil pan to re fit you need to buy one and thats $$$

     #4 80-100 pounds is not enough to even matter , I would bet that 90% of the people would not notice the difference , its easy to cure the troubles added weight adds if they are significant enough to matter, with added spring rate and larger sway bars, but the stock MGBs are oversprung as they are so things should be fine

    #5 Thats not a stock intake manifold on the Ford its a Trick Flow or other after market one, the stock one is much lower and with steel valve covers and not finned aluminum covers you have about 1/2 inch or more to play with, its been 10 years so don't hold me to this, you can also turn the intake plenum around if you need to as an added bonus

    #6 the T5 is a great addition to a Rover or Ford Installation but it defeats the purpose of getting a Rover 3500 for a parts car or a complete engine package from someone parting a 3500, also it requires an expensive adaptor plate and adds clutch and flywheel modifications into the "easy swap"

     

     added notes" To those of you out there that are doing the Rover or Buick 215 installations be aware that early Buick , Olds, and Pontiacs had amd have oiling issues caused by smaller oil galleys, they also are really bad with corrosion (electroliss) and 3 out of 4 will be so bad its not usable after all they are near 40 years old

    early BOP engines and Rover had a two piece rear main seal that is a pain in the ass and will always drip oil

    early BOP engines also have a flywheel that will expolde if RPMS are reached higher than 5k, be aware of this and DO NOT use an early BOP flywheel !!

    start with a late 90s Rover engine 4.0 , 4.6 they are so cheap now its not even worth trying to use a worn out old 60s engine, I see them at the local pick n pull in 92 and up Range Rovers and no one takes anything from them, don't use an early 3.9 the sleeves slip and cause all kinds of trouble, if you use a later Rover you will need to get a low mount water pump front cover and may have issues with the front drive oil pumps as I was told, I have never messed with anything later than a 4.0

    If any one wants I have somewhere everything you need to know about the BOP and Rover engines, rear main seal install on early blocks, stroker cranks ect, like I said before I built a 5.0 Rover 215 and still would do a Ford 5.0 before working on another Rover 215, I can scan it in the computer and attach it to a site or something, may take a few days to find, I even have the old Hot Rod Mag on the aluminum V8s which took years to find !!

    Long ago (17years) I met a guy that was into the Buick 215s when they were new, he had 30 engines at his house, he took me to a guy a few miles away that actually developed an overhead cam 215 in the early 60s, word was they were going to use this engine at Indy but they did not get it done in time and the results were not great, I actually was standing next to a prototype engine and all the sand castings for the heads, it was a cool walk back in time and was for sale then at a whopping 7k for everything !! I almost did it !!

     Its not that I hate the 215 based engines....they are fine in my TR8s and cars that came with then stock, they are just not a good choice for this day in age, its old school, if you want to drive a car that you know could have been faster with a little more work how will you feel then ? Why do thru so much work only to be dissapointed, Take a drive in any new car on the lot...Scion or Honda Civic Ford Focus....the 215 V8 mgbs are no match for even a newer minivan , thats why I sold my first stock TR8 after racing a Suzuki Swift and he really won!! 

     If if the oil pan is the only thin keeping you from 200 more Hp you have to be insane to not want to deal with that ! 

     I will do a 5.0 conversion to my 78 MGB this year and see what throubles there are, I have been wanting to do it for a while and will document everything this time and post it on my web site

    If welding skills are only set back to your swap, make templates out of cardboard and tahe them to a local metal shop and have them made, most places are cheap and if they have interest in what your doing they get a kick out of it too, My friend swapped a 3.0 OHC engine and trans in his TR6 and never welded anything himself  by doing the same thing and its an amazing swap , looks factory, he also supercharged his TR6 before Moss even had a kit and its so nice it really looks factory

     A friend who came from Hong Kong 10 years prior swapped a rotary Mazda in his Bugeye with very little help and made the mounts the same way, his car has a bridgeport 12A and was dynoed at 230 flywheel  and it looks pretty nice too for a 1st timer

    There are always ways to make things happen even if you don't have the skills you think you need, there are people around that will guide you and help you, I have helped several people get projects going , we need to teach the next generation what real Hot Rodding is , even the "rat rods" have 20k into them now and all new store bought parts...whats fun about that? all I see is a nice car that looks crappy because its primered

    To each his own and what ever anyone wants to do with thier car thats up to them, I have great experience with all types of cars and will be willing to share any info I can to help anyone out there

     

    I wish all of you the best in all your projects and in the end we are all just car guys that wanted a little more HP

  •  06-21-2007, 7:51 AM 7842 in reply to 7835

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Bugeye,

    I'm certainly enjoying the "discussion" between you and British V8. Keep it up, I find it quite entertaining. I do have one comment though, to contribute.

    In your item #4, you state that 80 to 100 pounds is not enough to matter. I beg to differ. Depending on just where it is placed with regard to the vertical and longitudinal axes, it's enough to matter so much that it could make a HUGE difference. These are sports cars, and as I have said many times on this forum, my belief is that balance and response is more valuable than brute power in the experience of driving them. Otherwise, you are only building two seat small muscle cars. If you place one hundred extra pounds in the nose of an MGB, you will turn it into a pig no matter what springs you use. The physics of this cannot be erased with different suspension pieces.

    We recently took a 215 Rover engine with gearbox and weighed it. Then we took an MGB engine and gearbox in the same degree of "dress" and weighed that. In spite of the fact that the Rover SD1 five speed is a chunky beast, the combination weighed fifty pounds less than the stock B power unit. Now THAT'S what I call an advance ! Both power and handling would be improved. No, I'm sure it won't beat your Ford powered Britdragster, but it would be a finely balanced and sufficiently quick machine for 95% of us. I'm sure it would never do for someone who just has to win at stoplights and the Friday Night Drags. As you infer, to each his own.

    One other small thing. With regard to commenting on the quality of work observed. I like to save my judgement for myself. That way my own work improves and I gain friends. Cheers.

     

     


    Motorbill
    From Lola to Land Rover, If it's British and has wheels, it's likely I've bloodied me knuckles thereupon
  •  06-21-2007, 7:18 PM 7905 in reply to 7835

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Bugeyev8:

    #2 if thats the same car then the owner was either unhappy with too much power and changed to a weaker 215 or he decided to do the opposite and install a Ford, if so why did he do that ?

    Sure enough, this is one of at least three MGB's I know of that have gone from a BOPR aluminum V8 engine to a Ford V8 engine because the owner wanted more power. I still haven't once disputed that the Ford engine produces more power per buck! Even still, I know many people who have built and are continuing to build cars with the BOPR engine. It's a great engine, with it's own unique advantages.

    Bugeyev8:

    #3 the later Rover engines have a huge aluminum oil pan and if you don't already have a 215 oil pan to re fit you need to buy one and thats $$$

    Actually, the going price is exactly $70. That's what D&D Fabrications has it for in their catalog (part number 1347480, page 20). Frankly, it's probably cheaper to just buy a parts engine because Buick/Olds/Pontiac 215's were made in similar quantities as MGB cars - so, if you just keep an eye on "Craig's List" you'll routinely see whole engines pop up for a couple hundred dollars. If you're patient you can score one with a 4-barrel intake manifold, a bellhousing, and a flywheel. A Chevy-spec T5 will bolt right up to a stock Buick bellhousing!   

    Bugeyev8:
     

     #4 80-100 pounds is not enough to even matter...

    We'll just have to agree to disagree on this one. But, if 80-100 pounds didn't really matter, who would buy aftermarket aluminum heads for their Ford engine? Lots of people do! (And aftermarket aluminum heads for a Ford motor only save you about 40 pounds.)

    Bugeyev8:
      

    added notes" To those of you out there that are doing the Rover or Buick 215 installations be aware that early Buick , Olds, and Pontiacs had amd have oiling issues caused by smaller oil galleys, they also are really bad with corrosion (electroliss) and 3 out of 4 will be so bad its not usable after all they are near 40 years old

    early BOP engines and Rover had a two piece rear main seal that is a pain in the ass and will always drip oil

    early BOP engines also have a flywheel that will expolde if RPMS are reached higher than 5k, be aware of this and DO NOT use an early BOP flywheel !!

    I only agree with one of these points. The original Buick rope-type rear-main oil seal is a pain in the butt.  A neoprene seal is available and should be used ($50, D&D part number 30135... or I understand you can use Ford part number CPAZ6701B if you prefer, although I haven't tried that.)

    My personal opinion on the lubrication systems on these old engines is that they're perfectly adequate for non-racing use IF THEY'RE IN GOOD REPAIR. The problem is that some people try to use a 40 year old oil pump and front cover. The easy fix is to instead use the front cover and oil pump from a Buick V6 (buy one NEW at your local Buick dealer.) These front covers come with a one-piece neoprene front seal.

    Here's a nifty trick. If you're making your own motor mounts and you put the engine in the right spot, you can spin an oil filter right onto the angled, V6-style, "metric" labeled oil pump and not need a remote filter. (This is slick - and cheap.) On the other hand, D&D makes a swivel adapter that (for a cost) will allow you to point the filter in whatever direction you need for added filter clearance.Show me a Ford V8 in an MGB that doesn't use a remote oil filter!

    I've used a stock Buick flywheel on my MGB V8 for fifteen years with no issues. I've never even heard of one blowing up! Frankly, I think this concern is a complete red herring. If there's anything wrong with these flywheels it's only that they're heavier than they need to be for such a light car. They were turned from a single piece of steel and they were balanced. If you're afraid of them, aftermarket flywheels are available.

    Bugeyev8:

    word was they were going to use this engine at Indy...

    The Mickey Thompson team DID use a Buick 215 at Indy in 1962. Dan Gurney was driving, and was named Rookie of the Year. It was the only non-Offenhauser car in the grid that year - and the only stock-block car to have raced there in many years. Gurney qualified competitively (8th, I think) and raced strongly until retiring with tranny problems.

    Jack Brabham's Formula 1 team won two consecutive Grand Prix championships with the Buick 215 in 1966 and 1967. (Okay, actually they used the Olds version, which is exactly the same except one more head bolt per cylinder. They also used Repco heads with overhead cams, but the blocks were STOCK Oldsmobile castings!)

    One of the cool things about the Buick 215 is that installing it is a "period modification". It is exactly on par with the MGB unibody chassis in terms of technology and aesthetic. Whereas the Sunbeam Tiger and Shelby Cobra (both of which used Ford V8's) were famously front-heavy, the MGB GT V8 was every bit as nicely "balanced" as a stock MGB except with roughly twice the original B-series engine's torque. The aluminum V8 represented ground-breaking engineering in its day. At 215 cubic inches, it's a nice size... obviously you want more, but other people are okay with an engine that's merely twice the size of the MGB's regular engine.

  •  06-21-2007, 11:03 PM 7909 in reply to 7905

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Guys,

    The Repco-Brabham V8 was actually Double overhead camshaft equipped. I once saw one with the front covers off. The entire valve train was driven by about umteen gears! No chains. I'm told when it ran the gear noise could be heard OVER the exhaust sound. This would have been a fright to drive, eh?


    Motorbill
    From Lola to Land Rover, If it's British and has wheels, it's likely I've bloodied me knuckles thereupon
  •  06-23-2007, 12:48 AM 7934 in reply to 7808

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    Bill,

    Take a look at the Nissan SR20DET alot of HP in a small all aluminum package that should do nice in an MGA, should require minimal cutting if any, they come with up to 300hp from the factory and 6 speed transmissions, they are a JDM only engine but there are importers in the US , extensive support via web forums and sites and tons of aftermarket parts availible, I have the wiring diagrams ect, for this engine

     If you really want power they make an inline 6 too...the name slipped my mind at the moment, but its in a Nissan Skyline in Japan

     would make an MGA go as good as they look !!

     Good to see more people going the modern route,  The twin cam 4 cylinders are so much better these days and make more HP than you could have imagined in the 60s and get great MPG, I get 30+ in my twin cam MGB and drive it everyday !!

     

    as per this post , I know that the 215 ran at Indy...I stated that this particular engine was built for Indy and never got there, the engine was a chain driven timing set up and not gears like the one Bill described

    Did any of you know that the 215 was actually used in an airplane too ???

  •  03-25-2012, 11:54 PM 26638 in reply to 3984

    Re: MGB V8 Conversions

    V8 or not V8 , thats the question

     

    Im rebuilding a 78 GT ,  im thinking about a 315 Buick , but  im not sure of the advantages between a V8 or a well beefed  up 1798 cc.  going to 2 L or more , please give me pros and cons about performance , i already know about prices and effort , but is is really worth it ? 

    Only about performance gains , i have seing many tunned up stocks making wonders.

    Thanks 

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