Moss Motors, Ltd

Our Sites: Moss USA | Moss Europe
The Moss Motors Forum is now read-only for informational purposes. The Moss Motors forum was
formed at a time when other forums were just getting started and other forums have proven that they
are a better model. We closed the forum because there is an abundance of information on more popular
forums and anything that was being posted, and answered, on our site was diluting the general knowledge
base. We suggest you check out BritishCarForum.com and MGExperience.net for a start.
Welcome to Moss Motors, Ltd Sign in | Join | Help
in Search

Rocker Panel/Sill & Floor Replacement

Last post 05-06-2011, 12:11 AM by ramerenz. 4 replies.
Sort Posts: Previous Next
  •  10-27-2007, 10:13 AM 10453

    Rocker Panel/Sill & Floor Replacement

    Sill Replacement

    The fact of the matter is that almost 90% of older British sports cars are in desperate need of floor and sill replacement. Anyone with the desire can take a few classes at a local vocational school and learn to weld in a short time. With the rising costs at restoration and body shops you can do the work yourself with a little practice and save money to use on another restoration! For about $200 - $250 a simple welding outfit can be purchased. However most clubs use funds to buy equipment like this so before you go out and buy your own check out your local club and see what resources they already have.

    At this stage most of our cars have holes or rust developing in the floors and rocker panels. It s very important with a unitized chassis that the bottom of the car Is completely sound because of the lack of support from lack of a roof. Over time as the floor and sills deteriorate you will notice the door gaps have changed and don t close as easily as they did while new. This is evidence of a weak floor and sills that need to be retired. Moss supplied me with the high quality reproduction parts I needed. For most of us this is a hard part, so take your time and be sure to buy all the correct parts to replace anything that shows any sign of deterioration . Also, don't overlook replacement of the door hinges and footwell panels. The most effective plan of action is to work on one side of the car at a time, removing and carefully replacing the required panels using the untouched side as
    a source of reference.

    Continue by removing the old rocker panels and the cross-member. After cleaning up the rusty edges all around the base of the car, then and only then, can you install the new floor-pan. Offer up the new floor into place and temporarily support it with five or six jack stands. Start by lining up the floor edge against the rear bulkhead; the front can be trimmed later. Tack weld the rear edge to the bulkhead in front of the rear axle under the car. Before welding the front of the floor-pan and footwell sides, the door gaps must be checked again and again. It is impossible to stress how important this step is.

    Lightly tack weld or rivet replacement panels in place until everything is together; make adjustments to align doors, etc. (you will make adjustments) and then seam-weld together for strength. The best way to do this is to lay all the parts on a level surface and test fit them together. Start by tack welding the inner rocker panels to the outer panels. Measure carefully and line up the jacking holes properly, then weld the cross-member to the floor, along with the footwell panels (if you plan on replacing them, too). After assembling the floor parts together, use a good rust preventative (We sell the best! A 2 1/2 liter kit of
    Finnigan's Waxoyl is sold under #225-36 - Ed) inside the cross-member and rockerpanels.

    The process of removing old panels is, in some regards, even more important than their replacement. Take careful note of how it all fits together and duplicate that as accurately as possible. Be careful not to destroy pieces you will need to reweld. Patience here goes a very long way.

    Jason Pinnow
    Bonita Springs, FL


    Working on automobiles is inherently dangerous. Moss Motors, Ltd. is not liable for injury or damage due to incorrect installation or use of their products. All products are sold with the understanding that the safe and proper installation and use of the products is the customer’s responsibility. Follow factory workshop manual procedures and instructions, but use current shop safety standards and common sense. Some tasks will require professional advice or services which Moss Motors cannot provide.

    If you have a specific comment or question and you'd like an immediate reply from Moss Tech Services, don't post here - please first email: BritishTechnicalSupport@mossmotors.com Please include the Title and Location of this tip if applicable.

    Forum FAQs here.

  •  10-29-2007, 8:01 AM 10750 in reply to 10453

    Re: Rocker Panel/Sill & Floor Replacement

    Excellent information from Jason. A couple of things that might be of help as well. For temporary fastening of panels try self drilling self taping sheet metal screws. Very easy to install with an electric drill used as a screw driver and easy to remove or loosen to make slight adjustments. The holes aren't any more difficult to weld up later than those for rivets and there's no 'rivet pieces' left over inside any cavity. Amen to the point of noting way panels are assembled when removing. Also be careful when cutting out an old panel not to cut into any wiring , brake or fuel lines that might be on the backside of the panel.


    '73 Midget (V6)
    '59 MGA (I6) under construction
    '73 Lotus Europa
    '52 MG TD kit car body project.
    '98 Jag XK8

    "There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness"
  •  10-31-2007, 8:05 AM 10857 in reply to 10750

    Re: Rocker Panel/Sill & Floor Replacement

    Please allow me to add this advice. If your machine is pretty bad in this area you may want to consider adding temporary bracing to maintain dimensional accuracy while you remove and replace parts. Sometimes, as with body on frame cars, like the MGA, it's best to do the repairs while the body sits firmly on the chassis, and the chassis is supported by its "natural" suspension points. In our shop, we wouldn't dream of removing an MGA body from its frame withoud welding in some fore and aft, as well as diagonal, support across the cockpit. Same for a TR6.

    In generall, get the dimensions right for the door openings first, then tack in some angle iron supports such that they will maintain those dimensions in both tension and compression, make sure things are the same side-to-side, then start removing and refitting stuff. This is the most critical part of any restoration we undertake, and we darned well take our time at it. Nobody wants to spend years and thousands to wind up with a bent or twisted sports car on which nothing will fit correctly and which will not handle well at all.


    Motorbill
    From Lola to Land Rover, If it's British and has wheels, it's likely I've bloodied me knuckles thereupon
  •  03-21-2010, 10:01 PM 23137 in reply to 10453

    Re: Rocker Panel/Sill & Floor Replacement

    Excuse a question from a complete amateur, but how do you remove the sill. I have 1973 with extensive rust. Floor is gone, crossmember must be replaced, passenger side longitudinal member missing. Do I just chip out the sill?

     

    Jim


    Jim Craven
  •  05-06-2011, 12:11 AM 25614 in reply to 10750

    Re: Rocker Panel/Sill & Floor Replacement

    Bill Young:

    Excellent information from Jason. A couple of things that might be of help as well. For temporary fastening of panels try self drilling self taping sheet metal screws. Very easy to install with an electric drill used as a screw driver and easy to remove or loosen to make slight adjustments. The holes aren't any more difficult to weld up later than those for rivets and there's no 'rivet pieces' left over inside any cavity. Amen to the point of noting way panels are assembled when removing. Also be careful when cutting out an old panel not to cut into any wiring , brake or fuel lines that might be on the backside of the panel.

    yeah right, it is very excellent info. well me, the Installation was done by the auto mechanic professional, however he told me that it can be a do it yourself project. actually i find it here at Kansas auto repair